Asia Initiatives

Sangaati: Leveraging Social Capital for Organic Farming

50 villages across Maharashtra, India

In recent years, Indian farmers have struggled financially in the midst of rapid industrial growth, and mentally in an environment characterized by alarmingly high suicide rates. In order to restore hope and prosperity in the lives of these farmers, AI teamed up with Save Indian Farmers and Deendayal Trust to initiate a switch from traditional farming methods to organic farming. A total of 600 farmers and their families benefit financially from the anticipated 1.5 times increase in crop output when utilizing organic methods such as herbal pest controllers, liquid organic fertilizers, and manure fertilizers. Most recent field report from the project can be read here which proves the success of the organic farming techniques.

We have strategically involved the female family members by empowering them to earn SoCCs through participation in monthly meetings, agri-camps, anti-tobacco camps, health camps, and self-help groups.  SoCCs may be redeemed for access to training materials, organic fertilizer storage tanks, medical checkups, and expert nutritional advice.  In addition to the extra money earned by farmers and their families, participants are expected to experience health and nutrition improvements from eating healthy organic products.

Well-known Dr. Manjusha Ghumare and Dr. Manoj along with 6 other gynecologists, joined our local partners to advise and conduct health camps for over 300 women participants. Dr. Ghumare's work included regular check ups such as blood tests, blood pressure, and weight management. In addition she recommended more specific tests such as bone density, Pap smears, TSH, BBL, CBL, and pelvis sonograms among others to women who need these. Dr. Ghumare will evaluate these lab reports as soon as they are available. (Updated June 2017)

After a long time due to the extensive use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, there has been a resurgence in traditional plant and animal life. Earthworms and spiders were spotted on the farm's land. (Updated June 2017) 

 

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